Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT

Latest Woodboring beetles Stories

2008-09-08 09:00:24

By Stephen Speckman Deseret News A vicious cycle is brewing in Utah: Bark beetles are killing a lot of trees in the state. Dead trees are fuel for wildfires, which experts say contributes to global warming. And climate change is now being blamed for an increased population of bark beetles. The Dixie National Forest bears one of the most obvious signs in Utah of the mark being left by a tiny tree predator commonly known as the bark beetle, a wood-boring insect that in large enough numbers...

2008-07-30 18:00:32

An invading Asian beetle, the emerald ash borer, has been found in trees in southern Missouri for the first time, scientists say. The beetles were trapped in a camp ground at Wappapello Lake near Poplar Bluff, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. They were recently identified as emerald ash borers. The borers were first discovered near Detroit in 2002. Since then, they have devastated ash trees in Michigan and have spread through at least six states, West Virginia, Maryland,...

2008-07-21 03:00:25

By Hazlehurst, John During the last 10 years, mountain pine beetles have killed more than 1.5 million acres of lodgepole pines statewide. Summit County, home to Colorado's ski industry, has been particularly hard hit. The verdant forests that once framed Breckenridge, Copper Mountain, Keystone and Beaver Creek are dying, attacked by an invading army of microscopic beetles less than an eighth of an inch in length. Tens of thousands of acres of dead or dying trees now surround...

a7524c49f20f085650c4eedfd6101e1a
2008-07-16 09:15:00

Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinky fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of towering trees, mostly...

2008-07-16 06:00:24

By Karl Puckett Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinkie fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of...

2008-07-06 09:00:11

By Christine Weeber Pesticides often have larger effects than we intend. Some of those used in responding to the mountain pine beetle infestation are no different. Carbaryl, the active ingredient in the most common sprays used to protect trees against beetles, is one of these. It is a neurotoxin that is dangerous to humans and pets through skin contact, inhalation and ingestion through food or water. And it is highly toxic to bees, stoneflies and some fish. In 2005, 12 groups representing...

2008-07-05 00:00:11

The emerald ash borer, a colorful beetle from Asia that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in seven U.S. states, was first reported in the U.S. in 2002. This month, forestry officials announced that the ash borer had been found within the city limits of Chicago. U. of I. Extension entomologist Phil Nixon talks about the infestation with News Bureau Life Sciences Editor Diana Yates. Is it possible to stop this bug? Probably not. It is likely to eventually eliminate ash trees in North...

30e034804ddb40894c06c7023b7cf469
2008-07-01 14:37:46

The USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) today announced that an SRS scientist and other researchers have officially named the fungus responsible for killing redbay and other trees in the coastal plains of northeastern Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina. Lead author and Iowa State University Plant Pathologist Tom Harrington, co-author and SRS Plant Pathologist Stephen Fraedrich, and Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences Researcher D.N. Aghayeva unveiled the name, Raffaelea...

2008-06-26 06:02:33

By Cramer, John Scientists, economists, land managers and others will gather Thursday in Missoula to discuss the worsening infestation of bark beetles across the West. "Red Tree," a one-day public symposium, is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the University of Montana's University Center Ballroom. The symposium is free, but registration is required at 542-4300. Mountain pine beetles and other bark beetles have killed millions of acres of trees from Alaska to the Southwest in recent...

2008-06-24 02:29:44

KNOXVILLE - A little green beetle has killed millions of ash trees in Michigan and the bugs may be spreading south. Officials at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park are worried the Asian emerald ash borer could be brought into the park on visitors' firewood. Park crews already are waging a costly and time-consuming battle against the hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect that destroys hemlock trees. Biologists say it's only a matter of time before the emerald ash borer reaches the...


Latest Woodboring beetles Reference Libraries

40_aa7129192d69d157eeabb7bc55896155
2005-09-12 09:52:32

The Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is native to China and Korea where it causes widespread destruction of poplar, willow, elm, and maple throughout vast areas of eastern Asia. Asian longhorned beetles are big, showy insects: shiny and coal black with white spots. Adults are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long. On their head is a pair of very long antennae that are alternately ringed in black and white. The antennae are longer than the insect's body. An invasive species in...

More Articles (1 articles) »