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Latest Woodboring beetles Stories

Climate Change Produces Complicated Consequences For North America's Forests
2013-10-15 11:35:58

Dartmouth College Dartmouth-led study is the most comprehensive review of warming's impacts on forest pests, diseases Climate change affects forests across North America – in some cases permitting insect outbreaks, plant diseases, wildfires and other problems -- but Dartmouth researchers say warmer temperatures are also making many forests grow faster and some less susceptible to pests, which could boost forest health and acreage, timber harvests, carbon storage, water recycling and...

Massive Spruce Beetle Outbreak In Colorado Tied To Drought
2013-10-10 13:03:38

University of Colorado Boulder A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates drought high in the northern Colorado mountains is the primary trigger of a massive spruce beetle outbreak that is tied to long-term changes in sea-surface temperatures from the Northern Atlantic Ocean, a trend that is expected to continue for decades. The new study is important because it shows that drought is a better predictor of spruce beetle outbreaks in northern Colorado than temperature alone,...

Fungal-farming Beetle Threatening Avocado Crops
2013-07-18 13:04:01

Penn State Beetles with unusual "green thumbs" for growing fungi are threatening avocado crops and could transform into a more destructive pest, according to an international team of researchers. Ambrosia beetles are insects that bore into trees and cultivate fungi to use as a food source for their young. The fungi -- species of Fusarium -- carried by types of the Ambrosia beetle can damage or even kill trees, making the beetle and its fungi a threat to avocado production in the U.S....

2013-04-08 12:02:09

Twenty researchers – more than half of them Simon Fraser University graduates and/or faculty – could become eastern Canada´s knights in shining white lab coats. A paper detailing their newly created sequencing of the mountain pine beetle´s (MPB) genome will be gold in the hands of scientists trying to stem the beetle´s invasion into eastern forests. The journal Genome Biology has published the paper. “We know a lot about how beetle infestations can...

Mountain Pine Beetle Genome Sequenced
2013-03-27 15:42:48

BioMed Central The sequencing and assembly of the genome of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is published online this week in Genome Biology. The species is native to North America, where it is currently wreaking havoc in an area of forest ten times larger than previous outbreaks. This paper determines genes that may be involved in colonizing the trees, such as enzymes for degrading plant cell walls, and identifies potential sex chromosomes in the beetle. D. ponderosae...

Decoys Could Prevent The Spread Of Ash-killing Beetles
2013-02-15 13:43:36

Penn State As the emerald ash borer ravages North American ash trees, threatening the trees' very survival, a team of entomologists and engineers may have found a way to prevent the spread of the pests. Emerald ash borers (EABs), a type of beetle native to Asia, first appeared in the U.S. about 20 years ago. They are now moving east from Michigan, killing ash trees on the Eastern Seaboard as far south as North Carolina. "Within 25 years, practically no ash trees may remain on either...


Latest Woodboring beetles Reference Libraries

40_aa7129192d69d157eeabb7bc55896155
2005-09-12 09:52:32

The Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is native to China and Korea where it causes widespread destruction of poplar, willow, elm, and maple throughout vast areas of eastern Asia. Asian longhorned beetles are big, showy insects: shiny and coal black with white spots. Adults are about 1 inch (2.5 cm) long. On their head is a pair of very long antennae that are alternately ringed in black and white. The antennae are longer than the insect's body. An invasive species in...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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