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2012-03-01 10:45:17

A recent decline in ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla), a ground-nesting migratory songbird, in forests in the northern Midwest United States is being linked by scientists to a seemingly unlikely culprit: earthworms. A new survey conducted in Minnesota's Chippewa National Forest and Wisconsin's Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest by a research team led by Scott Loss of the University of Minnesota and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center has revealed a direct link between the presence of...

2012-02-08 18:24:18

Obstacles in an organism's path can help it to move faster, not slower, researchers from New York University's Applied Math Lab at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences have found through a series of experiments and computer simulations. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, have implications for a better understanding of basic locomotion strategies found in biology, and the survival and propagation of the parasite that causes malaria....

2012-01-12 14:48:26

Scientists have long seen evidence of social behavior among many species of animals, both on the earth and in the sea. Dolphins frolic together, lions live in packs, and hornets construct nests that can house a large number of the insects. And, right under our feet, it appears that nematodes–also known as roundworms–are having their own little gatherings in the soil. Until recently, it was unknown how the worms communicate to one another when it's time to come together. Now,...

2012-01-06 10:15:15

Discovery at UCSF and Stowers Institute Shows Worm Regenerates Without Centrosome, a Structure Long Thought Necessary for Cell Division A tiny, freshwater flatworm found in ponds and rivers around the world that has long intrigued scientists for its remarkable ability to regenerate has now added a new wrinkle to biology. Reporting in the journal Science today, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City,...

2011-11-18 03:04:25

The lowly and simple roundworm may be the ideal laboratory model to learn more about the complex processes involved in repairing wounds and could eventually allow scientists to improve the body's response to healing skin wounds, a serious problem in diabetics and the elderly. That's the conclusion of biologists at the University of California, San Diego who have discovered genes in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans that signal the presence of surface wounds and trigger another series of...

Image 1 - Worms Among First Animals To Appear After Asteroid Impact
2011-10-11 12:21:28

University of Colorado researchers have found that worms were among the first animals to surface after an asteroid plowed into the Gulf of Mexico 65.5 million years ago. Geological sciences Associate Professor Karen Chin of the university said this "K-T extinction" is often focused on the survival and proliferation of mammals, and studies show some of the earliest terrestrial ecosystems to emerge were aquatic plants. However, new evidence from North Dakota shows networks of...

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2011-09-24 08:44:23

The Natural History Museum in London said on Friday that it is seeking the public's advice in naming a new species of sea-dwelling worm. The unnamed worms are known as annelids and the species spends its time about 6,500 feet below the surface of the sea in Antarctic. "Our goal is to show that taxonomy, the scientific discipline of naming new species, is interesting, fun and crucial to the advancement of science," zoologist at the National History Museum, Adrian Glover, said in a press...

Invasion Of The Earthworms
2011-09-12 09:22:21

  Non-native earthworms are damaging hardwood forests [ View the Science Nation Video ] Think of earthworms and a few things come to mind: they make great bait for fishing, they aerate the soil, and they're an excellent addition to a compost pile. But what a lot of people don't know is many earthworms are actually invasive species. "The western Great Lakes region, which is the area we're focused on, has no native earthworms," says ecologist Cindy Hale, a research associate...

2011-09-01 15:30:39

Study shows humans to blame for spread of non-native species It is widely acknowledged that human beings are largely responsible for the widespread alteration of ecosystems on the planet. A recent study by Dara Seidl and Peter Klepeis of Colgate University in New York traces the ways in which humans are the principal agents of dispersal of exotic earthworms in the forests of Northern America. Their findings, published online in Springer's journal Human Ecology, suggest that humans spread...

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2011-07-08 12:05:00

According to researchers, sex gives worms the power to fight off parasites. The researchers found that worms forced to reproduce asexually succumbed to a bacterial infection and died. The team said the results are the most convincing evidence to date for a key theory in evolutionary biology. The theory said that sex evolved because it allows organisms to reshuffle their genes into new combinations to stay a step ahead of parasites. The team said that reproducing asexually means there is no...


Latest Worm Reference Libraries

Mexican Golden Red Rump Tarantula, Brachypelma albiceps
2014-09-21 10:05:15

Mexican Golden Red Rump Tarantula (Brachypelma albiceps) is a species of the genus Brachypelma. The carapace is a light golden color with legs and a black abdomen covered with longer red hairs. Females typically live for about fifteen years. The males normally live about five years or up to twelve months after the last molt. This spider is native to the central highlands of Mexico, especially in Guerrero and south of Morelos. In the wild, they construct underground burrows, typically under...

Caecilian
2014-01-28 12:32:06

The Sagalla caecilian (Boulengerula niedini) is a long, earthworm-like amphibian from the family Caeciliidae. The species is native to the tiny area of south-eastern Kenya called Sagalla Hill. The Sagalla caecilian has a slender body, perfect for burrowing. Its skin is extremely pigmented, lending it a brownish color with a pinkish-red hint, and white cross segments that give the appearance of grooves. They can grow up to 12 inches in length. Along with tough skin and a bony head, the...

Trumpet Worm, Lagis koreni
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The trumpet worm (Lagis koreni) is a species of polychaete worm that is classified within the Annelida phylum. It can be found in the waters around Europe including the North Sea, the Arctic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Adriatic Sea. This species is typically found submersed in sand in the neritic zone. The trumpet worm can reach an average length of about one inch and is typically light pink in color, with visible red veins and two pairs of red gills. This...

Nightcrawler, Lumbricus terrestris
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The nightcrawler (Lumbricus terrestris), also known as the lob worm or the common earthworm in Britain and the dew worm in Canada, is a species of earthworm that is classified within the Annelida phylum. It is native to Europe, but has been introduced into other areas around the world. Although the species is not as abundant as other worms in its range, it is a widely known species in gardens of temperate habitats, where it moves about on the surface of the soil. The nightcrawler can reach...

Pompeii Worm, Alvinella pompejana
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) is a species of polychaete worm, or bristle worm that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. It resides at hydrothermal vents, making it an extremophile, and was first discovered French marine biologists of the coat of the Galapagos Islands in the 1980s. It was described by Lucien Laubier and Daniel Desbruyeres as a deep-sea polychaete that could withstand extreme amounts of heat. The Pompeii worm can reach an average length of up to five inches and is...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.