Quantcast

Latest Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering Stories

2012-05-31 10:55:23

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a method for building complex nanostructures out of short synthetic strands of DNA. Called single-stranded tiles (SSTs), these interlocking DNA "building blocks," akin to Legos®, can be programmed to assemble themselves into precisely designed shapes, such as letters and emoticons. Further development of the technology could enable the creation of new nanoscale devices, such as...

New Microdevice Enables Culture Of Rare Circulating Tumor Cells From Blood
2012-04-24 13:31:25

Ability to culture rare tumor cells isolated from blood could help improve patient response to therapy A research collaboration between the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Children´s Hospital Boston has created a microfluidic device that can harvest rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood to enable their expansion in culture for analysis. These cells, which have detached from a primary cancer site and often create a secondary --...

2012-02-29 11:45:38

Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute and Harvard Medical School induce magnetic sensitivity in a non-magnetic organism Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School have developed a method for inducing magnetic sensitivity in an organism that is not naturally magnetic–yeast. Their technology could potentially be used to magnetize a variety of different cell types in medical, industrial and research...

2012-02-17 00:30:29

Novel technology could potentially seek out cancer cells and cause them to self-destruct Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a robotic device made from DNA that could potentially seek out specific cell targets within a complex mixture of cell types and deliver important molecular instructions, such as telling cancer cells to self-destruct. Inspired by the mechanics of the body's own immune system, the technology might...

Insect Cuticle Inspires Low-Cost Material With Exceptional Strength, Toughness
2011-12-14 03:45:28

"Shrilk" could one day replace plastic in consumer products, be used to suture wounds, and serve as scaffolding for tissue regeneration Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have developed a new material that replicates the exceptional strength, toughness, and versatility of one of nature's more extraordinary substances -- insect cuticle. Also low-cost, biodegradable, and biocompatible, the new material, called "Shrilk," could one day...

fdd45ff7addc70d5892c5d8a4d5005d71
2010-06-29 09:30:00

Researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard and Harvard Medical School have engineered photosynthetic bacteria to produce simple sugars and lactic acid. This innovation could lead to new, environmentally friendly methods for producing commodity chemicals in bulk. Their research findings appear in the current issue of Applied and Environmental Biology. This photosynthetic factory could also reduce the carbon dioxide emissions associated with...

92e86f9ef8da6b3b2c0abc9a8f5664831
2010-06-25 05:17:52

Researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital Boston have created a device that mimics a living, breathing human lung on a microchip. The device, about the size of a rubber eraser, acts much like a lung in a human body and is made using human lung and blood vessel cells. Because the lung device is translucent, it provides a window into the inner-workings of the human lung without having to invade...

6f6d36588ecb39d2f57a4abd3d814c4c1
2010-06-03 08:01:09

Discovery has Potential Applications in Tissue Regeneration and High-Performance Textiles In Nature, cells and tissues assemble and organize themselves within a matrix of protein fibers that ultimately determines their structure and function, such as the elasticity of skin and the contractility of heart tissue. These natural design principles have now been successfully replicated in the lab by bioengineers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the School of...

d62a939e31cf3a085dac37afb4d66cd11
2009-10-20 07:52:19

Stacks of filter paper provide a realistic, easy-to-use medium for growing cells An insight from the labs of Harvard chemist George Whitesides and cell biologist Don Ingber is likely to make a fundamental shift in how biologists grow and study cells "“ and it's as cheap and simple as reaching for a paper towel. Ratmir Derda, a postdoctoral student co-mentored by Whitesides and Ingber at Harvard's new Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, has realized that by growing...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
Related