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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 16:13 EDT

Latest Xenoturbella Stories

Tiny Worm May Be Earliest Human Progenitor
2013-03-28 07:36:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A little worm, the Xenoturbella bocki, is causing a lot of contention amongst scientists debating whether it truly was the ancestor of mankind.  A new study involving the University of Gothenburg and the Gothenburg Natural History Museum indicates that the worm is indeed mankind's progenitor. Xenoturbella bocki is a one-centimeter-long worm built on a simple body plan that lacks a brain, sexual organs and other vital organs. It...

2011-02-16 15:38:44

Scientists reorganise the animal phylogenetic tree An international team of scientists including Albert Poustka from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has discovered that Xenoturbellida and the acoelomorph worms, both simple marine worms, are more closely related to complex organisms like humans and sea urchins than was previously assumed. As a result they have made a major revision to the phylogenetic history of animals. Up to now, the acoelomate worms were viewed as...

2011-02-10 15:49:20

Genetic research proves worm has evolved to be less sophisticated than its ancestors Evolution is not a steady march towards ever more sophisticated beings and therefore the search for the living "missing links" is pointless, according to findings published by a team of researchers led by Dr. Herv© Philippe of the Universit© de Montr©al's Department of Biochemistry. "Aristotle was the first to classify organisms "“ from the least to the most sophisticated. Darwin's theory...

2011-02-10 01:36:56

"Man is but a worm" was the title of a famous caricature of Darwin's ideas in Victorian England. Now, 120 years later, a molecular analysis of mysterious marine creatures unexpectedly reveals our cousins as worms, indeed. An international team of researchers, including a neuroscientist from the University of Florida, has produced more evidence that people have a close evolutionary connection with tiny, flatworm-like organisms scientifically known as "Acoelomorphs." The research in the...

2011-02-09 23:48:09

Two groups of lowly marine worms are related to complex species including vertebrates (such as humans) and starfish, according to new research. Previously thought to be an evolutionary link between simple animals such as jellyfish and the rest of animal life - the worms' surprising promotion implies that they have not always been as simple as they now appear. Although the marine worms Xenoturbella and Acoelomorpha are very simple animals "“ they lack a developed nervous system or gut...

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2010-04-19 12:23:07

Researchers at the Sven Lov©n Centre for Marine Sciences at the University of Gothenburg have discovered a brand new species of bacterium found only in the Gullmarsfjord north of Gothenburg. The bacterium has been named Endoxenoturbella lov©nii to honor the newly founded marine research center. Researcher Matthias Obst from the Department of Zoology is one of many marine scientists based at the Sven Lov©n Centre for Marine Sciences, a new institute owned by the University of...

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2009-09-23 09:59:18

In the most computationally intensive phylogenetic analysis to date, an international research team led by Brown University has found the first evolutionary branching for bilateral animals. The researchers determined that the flatworm group Acoelomorpha is a product of the deepest split within the bilateral creatures "” multicelled organisms that, like humans, have symmetrical body forms. Results appear online in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. When it comes to understanding a...

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2006-11-06 15:26:43

Genetic analysis of an obscure, worm-like creature retrieved from the depths of the North Atlantic has led to the discovery of a new phylum, a rare event in an era when most organisms have already been grouped into major evolutionary categories. The analysis also appears to shed light on the ancestor of chordates, the backboned animals that include human beings and two small invertebrate groups closely related to one another: lancelets and tunicates. Its a tremendous surprise that this...