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Latest Y chromosome Stories

2009-10-27 12:47:34

Cornell researchers have discovered a genetic mechanism in fruit flies that prevents two closely related species from reproducing, a finding that offers clues to how species evolve. When two populations of a species become geographically isolated from each other, their genes diverge from one another over time. Eventually, when a male from one group mates with a female from the other group, the offspring will die or be born sterile, as crosses between horses and donkeys produce sterile mules....

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2009-10-03 09:44:55

Diversity of fish in East African lakes points to mechanism for evolution of sex chromosomes Biologists have genetically mapped the sex chromosomes of several species of cichlid fish from Lake Malawi, East Africa, and identified a mechanism by which new sex chromosomes may evolve. In research published in this week's issue of the journal Science, biologists Thomas Kocher, Reade Roberts and Jennifer Ser of the University of Maryland describe the genetic basis for two co-existing systems of...

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2009-09-20 08:50:00

Men that suffer from a rare disease where they are plagued with extra female genes can still produce children after having surgery that gathers their sperm, says a new study. Men with Klinefelter's syndrome have an extra X chromosome. Usually men have a single X and Y-chromosome, and women have two X chromosomes. Men with Klinefelter's syndrome have two X and one Y chromosome, which can affect their fertility. Dr. Ranjith Ramasamy at New York-Presbyterian Hospital employed a surgery that...

2009-09-10 10:33:26

New study proves that communication between male and female occurs in our innermost beings In the week that the University of Leicester celebrates the 25th anniversary of the discovery of DNA fingerprinting (Thursday September 10) new findings from the world-renowned University of Leicester Department of Genetics reveal for the first time that the male and female do truly communicate "“at least at the fundamental genetic level. The research counters scientific theory that the X and Y...

2009-09-03 15:25:35

The unique mechanism behind the evolutionary survival of the human Y chromosome may also be responsible for a range of sex disorders, from failed sperm production to sex reversal to Turner Syndrome. Roughly six years ago, David Page's lab at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research reported the discovery of eight large areas of mirror-imaged genetic sequences, or palindromes, along the Y chromosome. Because the Y chromosome essentially has no partner with which to swap genes, a process...

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2009-07-17 08:50:56

Scientists have long suspected that the sex chromosome that only males carry is deteriorating and could disappear entirely within a few million years, but until now, no one has understood the evolutionary processes that control this chromosome's demise. Now, a pair of Penn State scientists has discovered that this sex chromosome, the Y chromosome, has evolved at a much more rapid pace than its partner chromosome, the X chromosome, which both males and females carry. This rapid evolution of...

2009-07-16 19:00:00

U.S. scientists say a rapid evolution of the Y chromosome carried only by men has led to a rapid gene loss that might lead to the chromosome's disappearance. Pennsylvania State University Associate Professor Kateryna Makova, who led the study, and researcher Melissa Wilson compared the DNA of the X and Y chromosomes in different classes of mammals. The researchers found that DNA of the human Y chromosome began to evolve rapidly 80 million to 130 million years ago. But while DNA on X...

2009-06-07 23:49:46

Boys who carry a variation of the gene Monoamine oxidase A, are more likely to join gangs and be among the most violent members, U.S. researchers said. Criminologist Kevin M. Beaver at Florida State University said the findings apply only to males -- not girls with the same variant of the so-called warrior gene. While gangs typically have been regarded as a sociological phenomenon, our investigation shows that variants of a specific MAOA gene, known as a 'low-activity 3-repeat allele,' play a...

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2009-06-05 11:20:00

Boys who carry a particular variation of the gene Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), sometimes called the "warrior gene," are more likely not only to join gangs but also to be among the most violent members and to use weapons, according to a new study from The Florida State University that is the first to confirm an MAOA link specifically to gangs and guns. Findings apply only to males. Girls with the same variant of the MAOA gene seem resistant to its potentially violent effects on gang membership...

2009-04-26 23:00:00

A researcher at Ohio State University says he is working on producing larger bluegill by breeding super males with two Y chromosomes. The male bluegill are about twice as big as females and thus more profitable for fish farmers, The Columbus Dispatch reported Sunday. Han-Pin Wang, a researcher in the Ohio State aquaculture lab, uses a method based on the genetic difference between males and females. Like humans, male bluegill normally have an XY chromosome pair while females have XX. Wang...