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Latest Y chromosome Stories

2005-12-16 10:00:00

Please read headline as "Longer conceptions" instead of "Longer pregnancies." LONDON (Reuters) - Women who take more than a year to conceive are more likely to have a baby boy, according to research published on Friday. Scientists at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, who studied data on 5,283 women who had babies between July 2001-2003, found that the probability of having a boy was 58 percent if it took longer than 12 months to get pregnant. The findings did not apply to...

2005-12-15 22:45:00

LONDON -- Women who take more than a year to conceive are more likely to have a baby boy, according to research published on Friday. Scientists at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, who studied data on 5,283 women who had babies between July 2001-2003, found that the probability of having a boy was 58 percent if it took longer than 12 months to get pregnant. The findings did not apply to women having fertility treatment. "Taking longer to reach lasting pregnancy increases the chances...

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2005-09-01 07:20:14

NEW YORK -- The human Y chromosome - the DNA chunk that makes a man a man - has lost so many genes over evolutionary time that some scientists have suspected it might disappear in 10 million years. But a new study says it'll stick around. Researchers found no sign of gene loss over the past 6 million years, suggesting the chromosome is "doing a pretty good job of maintaining itself," said researcher David Page of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass. That...

2005-08-31 18:26:28

The human and the chimpanzee Y chromosomes went their separate ways approximately 6 million years ago. But ever since this evolutionary parting, these two chromosomes have experienced different fates, new research indicates. While the human Y has maintained its count of roughly 27 genes and gene families over the last 6 million years, some of these same genes on the chimp Y have mutated and gradually become inactive. The authors speculate that one likely reason for such disparity is due to...

2005-07-21 18:24:35

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Breakages in chromosomes in mammalian evolution have occurred at preferred rather than random sites as long thought, and many of the sites are involved in human cancers, an international team of 25 scientists has discovered. The researchers, reporting in the July 22 issue of the journal Science, also found that chromosomal evolution has accelerated, based on the rate of breakages and reorganization, since the extinction of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. In a study led by...

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2005-03-16 13:45:56

Women get more work out of hundreds of genes on the X chromosome than men do, and that could help explain biological differences between the sexes, a new study says. The results imply that women make higher doses of certain proteins than men do, which could play out in gender differences in both normal life and disease, researchers said. So far, however, none of the genes identified in the study has been linked to any such observable differences, said senior study author Huntington Willard...

2004-11-25 03:00:20

The Y-chromosome is vital in the study of human evolution, writes Laoise Moore , winner of this year's 'Irish Times'/RIA biochemistry writing competition Our DNA connects us with the past. We inherit DNA, our genetic material, from our parents, who inherited it from their parents, and they from their parents and so on back to the origins of life. Our DNA is organised into 23 pairs of chromosomes, half from each parent. DNA occurs as a code of four letters: A, T, G and C. Variations in this...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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