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Latest Yale University Stories

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2011-04-06 13:54:20

Male monkeys looking for a good time might benefit from spending a bit longer getting to know a potential mate, according to a new study published online in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The time males spend around a prospective mate might be the key to detecting subtle sexual signals that show which females are fertile and which are not, according to the study, co-authored by an international team of biologists and psychologists. "The results of this study shed...

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2011-03-28 09:50:00

The good, the bad and the baby Babies know when their diapers are clean or dirty, or when their tummies are empty or full. All you have to do is ask any sleep-deprived parent. But can babies tell when someone is acting good or bad? With the help of some creative puppetry, Yale University psychologist Karen Wynn is proving they can. Wynn runs the Infant Cognition Lab at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. With help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), she studies the roots of morality,...

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2011-03-15 10:46:23

A new Yale University study looks at why there is such a big difference in the mortality rates among patients treated for heart attacks in hospitals across the country. The study appears in the March issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. Until now, little has been known about the factors that may influence this variation in death rates. The Yale team reviewed 11 hospitals through interviews and site visits. Those selected were among the best and worst performers, as rated by the federal...

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2011-03-02 09:22:47

Imagine a material that's stronger than steel, but just as versatile as plastic, able to take on a seemingly endless variety of forms. For decades, materials scientists have been trying to come up with just such an ideal substance, one that could be molded into complex shapes with the same ease and low expense as plastic but without sacrificing the strength and durability of metal. Now a team led by Jan Schroers, a materials scientist at Yale University, has shown that some recently developed...

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2011-02-25 09:08:34

No matter their size or shape, explosive volcanoes produce tremors at similar frequencies for minutes, days or weeks before they erupt. In the Feb. 24 issue of the journal Nature, researchers at Yale University and the University of British Columbia (UBC) describe a model that explains this strange phenomenon "“ and may help forecast deadly eruptions. When such volcanoes erupt they can shoot hot ash up to 40 kilometers into the atmosphere and cause devastating destruction when the ash...

2011-02-24 13:02:00

NEW HAVEN, Conn., Feb. 24, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Mira Dx announced today that it has licensed technology from Yale University based on the acceptance of a pivotal breast cancer study in the January issue of the journal Cell Cycle. While numerous BRCA1 coding sequence mutations are associated with breast cancer risk, such mutations in BRCA1 account for less than 5% of breast cancer risk. The research identified microRNA disrupting variants in and around BRCA1 that are polymorphic in breast...

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2011-02-18 07:10:00

The invention of the laser -- more than 50 years ago -- that has turned up in everything from Compact Discs to laser pointers, now has a new enemy: the "antilaser" -- the first device capable of trapping and terminating laser beams. The device was created by a team of researchers from Yale University and is capable of absorbing an incoming laser beam entirely. But the antilaser was not developed as a defense against high-power laser weapons, said the researchers. While such a device seems...

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2011-02-11 11:05:00

While enthusiasts across the world pored over the Voynich manuscript, penned by an unknown author in a language no one understands, a research team at the University of Arizona solved one of its biggest mysteries: When was the book made? University of Arizona researchers have cracked one of the puzzles surrounding what has been called "the world's most mysterious manuscript" "“ the Voynich manuscript, a book filled with drawings and writings nobody has been able to make sense of to this...

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2011-02-04 08:24:14

The potentially deadly bacterium Salmonella possesses a molecular machine that marshals the proteins it needs to hijack cellular mechanisms and infect millions worldwide. In a paper published Feb. 3 online in Science Express, Yale University researchers describe in detail how Salmonella, a major cause of food poisoning and typhoid fever, is able to make these proteins line in up in just the right sequence to invade host cells. "These mechanisms present us with novel targets that might form...

2011-01-31 20:55:01

A team of Yale University scientists has synthesized for the first time a chemical compound called lomaiviticin aglycon, leading to the development of a new class of molecules that appear to target and destroy cancer stem cells. Chemists worldwide have been interested in lomaiviticin's potential anticancer properties since its discovery in 2001. But so far, they have been unable to obtain significant quantities of the compound, which is produced by a rare marine bacterium that cannot be...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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