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Latest Yale Stories

2005-10-04 14:23:14

In the first study of its kind, researchers at Yale School of Medicine show how hospitals can streamline procedures to reduce the time they take to treat heart attack patients. The NIH-sponsored study, published in the September Journal of the American College of Cardiology, reports methods for delivery of rapid care based on the experiences of top programs. Studies have found that while every minute counts, few hospitals are able to perform at levels recommended by national guidelines. To...

2005-09-22 14:52:18

A state-of-the-art treatment program developed at Yale School of Medicine increases survival from the aggressive uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and spares some patients the need for additional therapy. The results are presented in the lead article of September's Gynecologic Oncology. The research team, led by senior author Peter E. Schwartz, M.D., The John Slade Ely Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Vice Chair and Director, determined that a combination of platinum-based...

2005-09-01 23:35:00

New Haven, Conn.- A new study by Yale researchers shows that prior nicotine exposure in mice can increase their motivation to respond work for food, weeks after their last exposure to nicotine, a finding that runs counter to the popular belief that nicotine exposure curbs appetite. The study, to be published in an upcoming issue of Psychopharmacology, also sheds new light on the role played by certain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when it comes to the reinforcing aspects of nicotine....

2005-08-04 17:47:19

New Haven, Conn. - Scientists at Yale and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory report the first large-scale survey of patterns of gene expression in flowers, using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, to identify the genes most likely to have critical roles in plant reproduction. The researchers studied 1765 lines and identified 80 genes active in petal and stamen development using "gene trapping." In this gene discovery technique a reporter tag was inserted into cells so that they stained blue...

2005-07-04 17:50:00

Sensors to detect suicide bombers before they can reach a target and detonate explosives would not substantially reduce deaths and injuries in urban settings, Yale researchers report in the July early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). "Widespread deployment of suicide bomber detectors would at best save a few lives," said Yale Professor Edward H. Kaplan, who co-authored the study with Moshe Kress. "A more promising strategy is to invest available resources in...

2005-06-22 12:15:00

New Haven, Conn. - Assistant Professor Mark Pagani in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Yale and his colleagues mapped the first detailed history of atmospheric carbon dioxide between 45 - 25 million years ago based on stable isotopes of carbon in a National Science Foundation study reported in Science Express. "Through the energy we consume, each of us makes a contribution to increasing greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide and methane, in the Earth's atmosphere," said Pagani....

2005-06-06 22:46:31

New Haven, Conn.--Confirming findings in a previous study, Yale researchers observed an altered availability of the dopamine transporter in healthy persons with a genetic variation linked to substance abuse and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). "Healthy people who carry a particular variant of the dopamine transporter gene, the nine repeat allele, have significantly higher levels of dopamine transporter in the brain," said the lead author, Christopher van Dyck, M.D., associate...

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2005-06-01 16:00:00

New Haven, Conn. - A report by Yale scientists in the journal Cell sheds new light on how the protein Ro, a major autoantigen in patients with autoimmune disease, recognizes misfolded RNAs, creating a RNA quality control system for cells. The quality control process in the cell has been well-studied for the DNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) components for making proteins. However, little was known about what cells do with abnormal or misfolded RNAs that are not translated into protein -- such as...

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2005-02-25 07:15:00

One of the key motivations for revisiting the probability of life elsewhere in the universe is the surprising proclivity of life in hostile places on Earth. New findings suggest that modern organisms may have useless DNA fragments today that once saved their ancestors lives in extreme environments. Astrobiology Magazine -- Yale scientists report in the journal Nature that the "missing" genes for tRNA in an ancient parasite are made up by splicing together sequences in distant parts of the DNA...

2005-01-30 09:42:47

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) -- A toxic chemical used to prevent barnacles from clinging to ship hulls may cause deafness in marine mammals and could lead whales to beach themselves, Yale researchers say. The hearing loss would be the latest environmental hazard linked to TBT, a chemical already known to be harmful to some aquatic life. TBT is banned in many countries but is still widely used. Yale researchers based their theory on a study of guinea pigs, because mammals have similar ear...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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