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Latest Yellowstone National Park Stories

2008-07-16 06:00:24

By Karl Puckett Amy Gannon, hatchet in hand, sliced a slab of bark from a lodgepole pine tree near Wolf Creek, Mont., and quickly spotted a mountain pine beetle larva no bigger than her pinkie fingernail. "This tree's done for," said Gannon, an entomologist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. As wildfires roar through tinder-dry forests in California, the mountain pine beetle is silently killing even more trees -- hundreds of thousands of acres of...

2008-07-03 03:00:17

By Anonymous Officials symbolically shredded a $3.7 million mortgage for a Gallatin County, Montana composting facility that processes waste from Yellowstone National The West Yellowstone-Hebgen Basin Composting Facility processes more than 3,000 tons of municipal solid waste a year from the park and surrounding area. The money was appropriated by Congress, which gave the NPS the authority to pay off the loan. Copyright J.G. Press Inc. Jun 2008 (c) 2008 BioCycle. Provided by ProQuest...

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2008-06-25 10:21:57

Almost every June for 30 years, Terry McEneaney drove around Yellowstone National Park and listed every bird he heard along three routes. Park ornithologist at the time, he would drive to a designated spot and identify the birds there. Then he'd drive another half mile, repeat the process and continue until he had stopped 50 times in 24.5 miles for the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Trying to finish before the birds quit singing, he'd ignore the scenery as best he could and try not to...

2008-06-16 03:00:14

By McKee, Jennifer HELENA - More than half of Montana's wheat fields are withering in an early-season drought, putting $671 million worth of wheat at risk new state agriculture statistics show. Ranchers in the affected area, which stretch-es across much of central Montana and a sliver of Eastern Montana, are already buying up hay and looking at selling off herds for want of forage and stock water "It's dismally dry," said Peggy Stringer, director of the National Agricultural Statistic...

2008-04-29 16:40:22

Bison could make a big comeback all across North America over the next 100 years, a conservation group said today. Bison once numbered in the tens of millions across the continent, but these icons of the American West were wiped out by commercial hunting and habitat loss. By 1889, fewer than 1,100 individuals remained. 1n 1905, the American Bison Society formed at the current Bronx Zoo headquarters of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and began efforts to repopulate reserves on...

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2008-04-11 01:55:00

The continued slaughter of bison migrating from the west side of Yellowstone National Park has sparked outrage in environmental groups and bison advocates who requested a moratorium on Thursday.Since last fall, a state-federal livestock disease management program has been forced to kill or remove 1,598 bison seeking food at lower elevations outside the park.Another wave of bison are expected to migrate soon to Montana calving grounds and critics say the slaughter is threatening the viability...

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2008-04-03 00:45:00

A report from the Government Accountability Office on Wednesday criticized federal and state agencies for the record number of bison deaths in Yellowstone National Park.Yellowstone is home to almost 3,600 free-roaming bison, some of which routinely migrate from the park during winter for food. This has been a concern to many local officials as it increases the risk of spreading brucellosis"”a contagious bacterial disease that some fear could be transmitted to livestock.In late 2000,...

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2008-03-03 16:19:05

Fewer wolves may mean fewer pronghorn in greater Yellowstone As western states debate removing the gray wolf from protection under the Endangered Species Act, a new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society cautions that doing so may result in an unintended decline in another species: the pronghorn, a uniquely North American animal that resembles an African antelope. The study, appearing in the latest issue of the journal Ecology, says that fewer wolves mean more coyotes, which can prey...

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2008-02-22 06:00:00

Following a 13 year restoration effort, 1,500 Gray wolves now inhabit the Northern Rocky Mountain states of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, and federal authorities say the wolves will now be removed from the official endangered species list.   Gray wolves were almost completely exterminated in the United States a hundred years ago, and the successful restoration represents a dramatic turnaround for the animals. "Gray wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains are thriving and no longer...

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2008-02-14 13:45:00

A new study by the Bronx Zoo-based Wildlife Conservation Society found that jack rabbits living in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem have apparently hopped into oblivion. The study, which appears in the latest issue of the journal Oryx, also speculates that the disappearance of jack rabbits may be having region-wide impacts on a variety of other prey species and their predators. According to the study, historical records from more than 130 years ago indicate that white-tailed jack rabbits...


Latest Yellowstone National Park Reference Libraries

Gallatin National Forest
2013-11-27 15:54:29

The Gallatin National Forest was founded in 1899 and is located in south-central Montana, United States. The forest makes up 1,819,515 acres and has parts of both the Absaroka-Beartooth and Lee Metcalf Wilderness areas within its boundaries. Gallatin National Forest borders the Yellowstone National Park on the north and the northwest and is a part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a region which includes nearly 20,000,000 acres. The forest is named after Albert Gallatin, U.S. Secretary of...

Caribou-Targhee National Forest
2013-11-21 15:52:49

Caribou-Targhee National Forest can be found in the states of Idaho and Wyoming, with a small section located in Utah in the United States. The forest is broken into several separate sections and stretches over 2.63 million acres. Towards the east, the forest borders Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Bridger-Teton National Forest. The majority of the forest is a part of the 20 million acre Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The Caribou and Targhee National Forests were...

Yellowstone National Park
2013-04-17 13:14:01

Yellowstone National Park is located in the United States. The majority of the park is located in Wyoming, but there are smaller areas of the park in Idaho and Montana. It is thought that this area was the first to be established as a national park in the entire world. The area was home to Native Americans for about 11,000 years, but was not well known to Americans until the 1860’s, when the first organized explorations were conducted there. The Lewis and Clark Expedition in the 19th...

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2005-06-02 09:20:16

Sand-verbena is a genus of about 35-40 species of annual or perennial herbaceous plants in the family Nyctaginaceae. They are native to western North America, from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming south to west Texas, California and northern Mexico, and grow on dry sandy soils. They make very attractive garden plants for hot, dry sandy sites. Despite the name, they are not related to the vervains (Verbena, family Verbenaceae).

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