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Latest Yoshihiro Kawaoka Stories

Modern Bird Genes Have Potential To Cause A Pandemic Similar To 1918 Spanish Flu
2014-06-12 10:02:18

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Avian bird flu strains that exist today share very similar characteristics with the deadly 1918 Spanish Flu strain that killed nearly five percent of the world’s population. That flu virus pandemic was the worst outbreak ever recorded and new research has found that only a few amino acids separate viral proteins currently found in bird populations from those that existed during the 1918 virus. The new evidence suggests a similar...

2013-07-10 19:51:41

The emerging H7N9 avian influenza virus responsible for at least 37 deaths in China has qualities that could potentially spark a global outbreak of flu, according to a new study published today (July 10, 2013) in the journal Nature. An international team led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Tokyo conducted a comprehensive analysis of two of the first human isolates of the virus from patients in China. Their efforts revealed the H7N9 virus's...

2012-10-09 20:40:59

Renowned virus experts address the moratorium on potentially hazardous H5N1 influenza research Last winter, scientists at the University of Wisconsin and Erasmus University (Netherlands) shocked the world by announcing they had developed strains of H5N1 influenza that could easily pass between mammals (ferrets). In nature, H5N1 is extremely lethal (kills nearly 60% of its human cases), but it does not easily spread from person-to-person. Thus, biosafety concerns were raised over the...

Controversial Avian Flu Research Finally Published
2012-05-03 07:05:51

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com A controversial report regarding avian flu research was finally published on May 3 in the journal Nature. The research, which studies how the avian H5N1 influenza spreads among mammals, had been contested by a government review panel who wanted to stop the report from being published. According to Med Page Today, the study finds four key mutations in a gene of the H5N1 avian flu that helps it adjust to mammals. The debate about the publication of the...

Bird Flu Research To Remain Unpublished For Now
2012-02-19 05:18:06

A World Health Organization (WHO) panel has ruled that a pair of studies detailing how scientists were able to mutate the H5N1 bird flu virus into a strain that could lead to a global pandemic will not be published in the near future, various media outlets reported on Friday. According to Eryn Brown of the Los Angeles Times, a 22-person panel of experts drafted by the WHO decided to extend a moratorium on the research indefinitely, announcing that scientific journals Nature and Science...

2010-08-06 17:54:56

The influenza virus, scientists well know, is a crafty, shape-shifting organism, constantly changing form to evade host immune systems and jump from one species, like birds, to another, mammals. Now, in a report in the current (Aug. 5) Public Library of Science Pathogens, an international team of scientists shows that the recent pandemic-causing H1N1 flu virus used a new biochemical trick to spread efficiently in humans. The new work expands the repertoire of known factors flu viruses can use...

2010-02-22 17:23:30

MADISON -- Genetic interactions between avian H5N1 influenza and human seasonal influenza viruses have the potential to create hybrid strains combining the virulence of bird flu with the pandemic ability of H1N1, according to a new study. In laboratory experiments in mice, a single gene segment from a human seasonal flu virus, H3N2, was able to convert the avian H5N1 virus into a highly pathogenic form. The findings are reported the week of Feb. 22 in the online early edition of the...

2009-12-21 15:41:50

The specter of a drug-resistant form of the deadly H5N1 avian influenza is a nightmare to keep public health officials awake at night. Now, however, a study published this week (Dec. 21) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests that a new compound, one on the threshold of final testing in humans, may be more potent and safer for treating "bird flu" than the antiviral drug best known by the trade name Tamiflu. Known as T-705, the compound even works several days...

2009-07-14 21:23:51

A team of U.S. virologists says the H1N1 flu virus pathogen is more virulent than previously thought. Study leader Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison says that in contrast with run-of-the-mill seasonal flu viruses, the H1N1virus, commonly referred to as swine flu, exhibits an ability to infect cells deep in the lungs, where it can cause pneumonia and, in severe cases, death. Seasonal viruses typically infect only cells in the upper respiratory system, Kawaoka says....

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2008-12-30 07:35:00

Researchers have discovered what caused the 1918 flu pandemic to be so fatal: a combination of three genes that allows the virus to enter the lungs and produce pneumonia. They combined samples of the 1918 influenza with contemporary flu viruses to locate the three genes and stated that their investigation may aid in the expansion of newer flu drugs. The findings may indicate mutations that could cause the regular flu virus to mutate into a hazardous pandemic strain. Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'