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luin6_001_php
2012-06-15 04:56:02

Symbol: LUIN6 Group: Dicot Family: Rubiaceae Classification:       Kingdom   Plantae – Plants Subkingdom   Tracheobionta – Vascular plants Superdivision   Spermatophyta – Seed plants Division   Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants Class   Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons Subclass   Asteridae Order   Rubiales Family   Rubiaceae – Madder family Genus   Luculia Sweet –...

bayu_001_php
2012-06-18 09:19:16

Symbol: BAYU Group: Dicot Family: Fabaceae Duration: Perennial Growth Habit: Shrub Vine Native Status: L48    I Distribution: County distributions for the following U.S. states are available at PLANTS:FL Classification:       Kingdom   Plantae – Plants Subkingdom   Tracheobionta – Vascular plants Superdivision   Spermatophyta – Seed plants Division   Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants Class  ...

0_1b55a09229112d97ebfb5aaa4e005fcc
2011-04-11 15:10:03

Yunnanosaurus, meaning "Yunnan lizard," is a genus of prosauropod dinosaur from the Early to Mid Jurassic Period. This was perhaps one of the last living prosauropods of the time. It was discovered by Yang Zhongjian in the Lufeng Formation of Yunnan, China. The find consisted of twenty incomplete skeletons, including two skulls, and were excavated by Tsun Yi Wang. The type species, Y huangi, was named by C.C. Young in 1942, and created the family Yunnanosauridae based on the findings as a...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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