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Latest Zhen Yan Stories

2014-04-04 23:33:51

By illuminating mitochondria, UVA researchers shed light on disease and human health. Charlottesville, VA (PRWEB) April 03, 2014 Under the microscope, they glow like streetlights, forming tidy rows that follow the striations of muscle tissue. They are mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells, and researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have created a method to illuminate and understand them in living creatures like never before. Not only can the researchers make the...

2014-01-20 23:01:58

Obesity Shown to Have Harmful Effect on Important Gene; Exercise Prevents That, UVA Finds Charlotsville, VA (PRWEB) January 20, 2014 Exercising during pregnancy can help protect the unborn child from diabetes and other health problems in later life, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. Researchers have determined that exercise during pregnancy prevented a damaging epigenetic effect of the mother’s obesity – an effect believed to put chemical marks...

2013-07-10 10:10:45

The idea that females are more resilient than males in responding to stress is a popular view, and now University at Buffalo researchers have found a scientific explanation. The paper describing their embargoed study will be published July 9 online, in the high-impact journal, Molecular Psychiatry. "We have examined the molecular mechanism underlying gender-specific effects of stress," says senior author Zhen Yan, PhD, a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics in the UB...

2012-03-08 06:13:53

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Stress is a term commonly used today, and we know it can have an impact on one´s mental and physical well-being. Now researchers are saying it may affect your memory too! New research out of State University in New York, uncovered a neural mechanism that directly links repeated stress with impaired memory. Stress hormones are known to influence the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a brain region that controls high level "executive" functions such as working memory...

2012-03-08 00:52:49

Neuron paper by UB researchers reveals why chronic stress in adolescence impairs memory, may trigger mental illness Chronic stress has a more powerful effect on the brain during adolescence than in adulthood and now there's proof at the molecular level. "We have identified a causal link between molecules and behaviors involved in stress responses," says Zhen Yan, PhD, a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. "It's...

2012-03-08 00:48:08

Anyone who has ever been subject to chronic stress knows that it can take a toll on emotions and the ability to think clearly. Now, new research uncovers a neural mechanism that directly links repeated stress with impaired memory. The study, published by Cell Press in the March 8 issue of the journal Neuron, also provides critical insight into why stress responses can act as a trigger for many mental illnesses. Stress hormones are known to influence the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a brain...

2009-07-23 10:43:09

 Experiencing chronic stress day after day can produce wear and tear on the body physically and mentally, and can have a detrimental effect on learning and emotion. However, acute stress -- a short stressful incident -- may enhance learning and memory.Researchers at the University at Buffalo have shown, in trials using rodents as an animal model, that acute stress can produce a beneficial effect on learning and memory, through the effect of the stress hormone corticosterone (cortisol in...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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