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Audio Created From Japanese Seismic Wave Records
2012-03-07 05:43:29

A scientist has converted last year's 9.0-magnitude Tohoku-Oki, Japan earthquake's seismic waves into audio files to allow researchers to "hear" what the quake sounded like as it moved through the earth. Zhigang Peng, associate professor in Georgia Tech´s School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, was able to capture the sound because of thousands of seismometers in the region and Japan's willingness to share their measurements. “We´re able to bring earthquake data to...

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2011-07-19 09:30:41

Seismic response Japan's March 11 Tohoku Earthquake is among the strongest ever recorded, and because it struck one of the world's most heavily instrumented seismic zones, this natural disaster is providing scientists with a treasure trove of data on rare magnitude 9 earthquakes. Among the new information is what is believed to be the first study of how a shock this powerful affects the rock and soil beneath the surface. Analyzing data from multiple measurement stations, scientists at the...

2011-02-25 15:15:54

By studying seismographs from the earthquake that hit Chile last February, earth scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found a statistically significant increase of microearthquakes in central California in the first few hours after the main shock. The observation provides an additional support that seismic waves from distant earthquakes could also trigger seismic events on the other side of the earth. The results may be found online in the journal Geophysical Research...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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