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Latest Zoological nomenclature Stories

107-year Journey Of The Beetle Rhipidocyrtus Muiri
2014-07-14 03:24:21

Serendipity leads University of Kansas scientists to the discovery and description of Rhipidocyrtus muiri - a 107 year old, lost in collections specimen, which turned out to represent a new genus and species.

2014-06-24 23:06:45

In regards to recent discussion, leaders of the Entomological Society of America's SysEB Section support museum collections that house biological specimens, and encourage future collecting

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2007-05-23 03:00:00

Happy anniversary: the man who gave us the key to the natural world was born 300 years ago today. Carl Linnaeus, who created the system of scientific names that we still use for all living things, began life in a turf-roofed farmstead in southern Sweden on 23 May, 1707.


Latest Zoological nomenclature Reference Libraries

Dryinus grimaldii
2014-11-19 13:05:38

Dryinus grimaldii is an extinct species of wasp that is classified within the Dryinidae family and was once found in Hispaniola. This species was first discovered encased in amber on the island of Hispaniola and is known from five female individuals. Both the holotype, the original specimen used to describe the species, and the paratype, the individual studied to further describe the species, are encased in orange amber and stored at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City....

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2014-01-12 00:00:00

Biology is the study of living organisms. Before the 19th century, biology was known as natural history (the study of all living things). Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus was the first person to coin the term biology. Biology comes from the Greek words bios (meaning "life") and logia (meaning "study of"). It is a common science that is a standard subject in schools and universities around the world. Over a million papers are published annually in biology and medicinal journals. Not just a...

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Word of the Day
whirret
  • To give a box on the ear to.
The word 'whirret' may be onomatopoeic.