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Latest Zoological Society of London Stories

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2010-07-13 08:35:00

Parks need urgent support to halt loss of key species African national parks like Masai Mara and the Serengeti have seen populations of large mammals decline by up to 59 percent, according to a study published in Biological Conservation. The parks are each visited by thousands of tourists each year hoping to spot Africa's 'Big Five' "“ lion, elephant, buffalo, leopard and rhino "“ but the research shows that urgent efforts are needed to secure the future of the parks and their...

2010-07-02 16:17:35

Fewer males than females are surviving the negative effects of inbreeding in a reintroduced population of a rare New Zealand bird, reports new research published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Studying a population of the endangered New Zealand Hihi, researchers from the Zoological Society of London found that male survival rate was 24 per cent lower than their female siblings during early development, and as chicks. The researchers analysed 98 clutches on Tiritiri Matangi Island, a...

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2010-05-20 11:22:00

The world's most ancient frogs may soon be mined to extinction, if the New Zealand government's plans to open up a conservation area for mining go ahead. The primitive Archey's frog (Leiopelma archeyi) and Hochstetter's frog (Leiopelma hochstetteri) are two of the species that inhabit the area of 'high conservation value' on New Zealand's North Island where the mining is planned to take place. Archey's frog is currently ranked top of the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) EDGE of Existence...

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2010-03-31 08:10:00

Common toads (Bufo bufo) can detect impending seismic activity and alter their behavior from breeding to evacuation mode, suggests a new study in the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) Journal of Zoology. Researchers from The Open University reported that 96 percent of male toads in a population abandoned their breeding site five days before the earthquake that struck L'Aquila in Italy in 2009. The breeding site was located 74 km from the earthquake's epicenter. The number of paired toads...

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2010-03-17 10:55:00

A new assessment of the Arctic's biodiversity reports a 26 percent decline in species populations in the high Arctic. Populations of lemmings, caribou and red knot are some of the species that have experienced declines over the past 34 years, according to the first report from The Arctic Species Trend Index (ASTI), which provides crucial information on how the Arctic's ecosystems and wildlife are responding to environmental change. While some of these declines may be part of a natural cycle,...

2010-01-08 12:39:57

Putting yourself in the line of fire is shown to reap huge rewards, in a new study published this week in Science. Researchers from the Zoological Society of London, University of Queensland and the University of Neuchâtel have discovered that male cleaner wrasse are quick to play the hero when their dinner is at stake. Cleaner wrasse live on coral reefs and feed on the parasites of larger 'client' fish. They gain an even bigger meal if they take some of the mucus off the...

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2009-10-10 08:10:00

The secret lives of some of Africa's iconic carnivores, including big cats, were revealed in a new study in Animal Conservation, on Oct. 9. The results shed light on how different habitats are used by some of Tanzania's most elusive meat eaters, such as the leopard. Scientists from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI) carried out the largest survey of Tanzania's carnivores, using a novel approach...

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2009-08-27 06:45:00

The world's leading amphibian experts have come together and for the first time identified two major conservation initiatives to protect the amphibians of the world from becoming extinct. The new coalition of organizations, the Amphibian Survival Alliance, will work together on scientific research and fund-raising to focus on containing the spread of the amphibian chytrid fungus and protecting the only amphibian habitats that contain amphibians that are not found anywhere else in the world....

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2009-07-07 05:55:00

A group of experts warned on Monday that increasing acidity of the world's oceans and warming water temperatures from CO2 emissions could wipe out coral reefs by the end of this century. At a meeting in London, the scientists said the pace of CO2 emissions would mean a level of 450 parts per million (ppm) of atmospheric CO2 will be reached by 2050, placing coral reefs on a path to extinction in the following decades. "Coral reef survival is balancing on a knife edge as the combined effects of...

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2009-06-20 08:50:00

International targets set for reducing biodiversity loss may still be achieved with the help of a new online conservation tool. The new initiative led by the Zoological Society of London brings together information on the world's threatened species and demonstrates that we know the least about the status of animals and plants in areas where diversity is greatest. This means that in parts of the world where conservation planning may be most critical, we lack information to effectively...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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