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Birdsongs Automatically Decoded By Computer Scientists

Birdsongs Automatically Decoded By Computer Scientists

Queen Mary, University of London Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The...

Latest Zoomusicology Stories

2013-12-05 10:23:28

Attracting katydid females in the presence of a masking sound As darkness descends upon the tropical rainforests of Malaysia, male chirping katydids of the Mecopoda complex are just getting warmed up for their usual nightly concerts to woo the females. These nocturnal suitors are favoured for chirping in synchrony as a chorus; however, singing in time with one another is no easy task as they have to co-ordinate in the presence of the noisy serenades from a very closely related katydid...

Higher Pitch Bird Songs Are Louder
2013-01-11 19:07:25

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Have you ever been to oh, let´s say, New York City or Chicago? Maybe Philadelphia or even downtown Fort Worth? If you have and you are, like me, a lover of city life and city residents, you will have noticed that the inhabitants of these cities move a little faster, have a little less patience and talk quite a bit louder. Is it the environment that drives these actions and behaviors? Does the city just attract these...

Songbirds Sing In 3D
2013-01-08 19:14:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Since both human and songbird infants learn vocal communication at an early age, the cognitive mechanisms behind bird songs have a rich history of groundbreaking research. However, an international team of scientists decided to take a deeper look into the physical mechanics behind birds´ vocalizations, according to a new study in the open access journal BMC Biology. "We know quite a bit about how the songbird brain...

Birdsong Study Looks Into Whether Music Is Uniquely Human
2012-12-31 09:16:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many birds use song to communicate everything from threats to mating intentions, but are these vocalizations considered music? Emory University neuroscientist Sarah Earp, also a classically trained viola player, decided to tackle this question, along with her colleague Donna Maney, by comparing neural responses of birds while they listened to male bird songs. “We found that the same neural reward system is activated in female...

Male Finches Fake Their Song For Foreign Females
2012-12-19 12:23:34

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online British researchers have found that male finches will use their birdsongs like their human counterpart use an out-of-date Facebook profile picture — to trick a potential mate into thinking they are more physically fit than they actually are. According to the team´s report in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, these males only ply their deception with females they have just met, as familiar lady birds can see through...

2012-06-20 12:07:22

iPod owners aren't the only ones who frequently shuffle their favorite tunes. Baby songbirds do it, too, a new study shows. A baby songbird prefers to learn the clearest versions of songs he hears and uses them to build his personal playlist for life. As a result, noise, from nature and humans, influences which songs a bird learns to sing and can create lasting changes to his species' top tunes, the study's results suggest. "There's been an enormous amount of interest in how...

2011-02-01 01:50:44

It takes songbirds and baseball pitchers thousands of repetitions "“ a choreography of many muscle movements -- to develop an irresistible trill or a killer slider. Now, scientists have discovered that the male Bengalese finch uses a simple mental computation and an uncanny memory to create its near-perfect mate-catching melody -- a finding that could have implications for rehabilitating people with neuromuscular diseases and injuries. Young male Bengalese finches practice their...

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2011-01-02 15:05:50

Researchers have developed a simple rubber device that is capable of replicating complex bird songs. According to the researchers, a song can be produced by blowing air through the device, which mimics a bird's vocal tract. The study challenges the theory that birds have to learn complicated neurological controls in order to produce distinctive cells. The researchers plan to share their data with biologists to see if it sheds new light on how birds produce their music. "I definitely did...

2010-11-22 13:31:06

Stretched tube designed by harvard researchers mimics zebra finch songs For centuries, hunters have imitated their avian prey by whistling through their fingers or by carving wooden bird calls. Now a team of physicists at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has reproduced many of the characteristics of real bird song with a simple physical model made of a rubber tube. "We wanted to know if you [could] build a simple device, which has minimal control but reproduces some non-trivial...

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2010-11-09 08:50:00

By Katrina Voss, Penn State University A team of scientists has observed the activity of nerve cells in a songbird's brain as it is singing a particular song. Dezhe Jin, an assistant professor in the Department of Physics at Penn State University and one of the study's authors, explained that understanding how birds string together sets of syllables "” or notes in a song "” may provide some insight into how the human brain learns language and produces speech. The research will be...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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