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Latest Zoonoses Stories

2012-08-10 02:40:25

Researchers have successfully tested a vaccine for the deadly Nipah virus in monkeys, raising hopes that it could provide similar protection for humans. With greater than a 75 percent fatality rate and the ability to be transmitted directly from person to person, Nipah has long been a significant concern for infectious-disease experts. The virus, which is carried naturally by fruit bats, was first discovered in Malaysia in 1998. Outbreaks have occurred in nearly every year since, in...

New Virus In Bats May Hold Key To Hendra Virus
2012-08-03 11:30:53

Australian scientists have discovered a new virus in bats that could help shed light on how Hendra and Nipah viruses cause disease and death in animals and humans. The new virus - named 'Cedar' after the Queensland location where it was discovered - is a close relative of the deadly Hendra and Nipah viruses. However, CSIRO's initial studies have discovered one surprising key difference - the Cedar virus does not cause illness in several animal species normally susceptible to Hendra and...

Amazonians Exposed To Vampire Bat Bites Have Natural Immunity To Rabies
2012-08-02 10:35:19

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online US scientists studying indigenous tribes in the Amazon have found six native Peruvian Amazonians who, after being bitten by rabid vampire bats, suffered no ill effects. Rabies infections from vampire bat bites are quite common in the Amazon region. And in many of the indigenous tribes, most infections are fatal due to lack of access to proper medical treatment. Rabies attacks the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord)...

2012-07-20 00:15:00

Genome research for the health of the poorest of the poor Belgian scientists of the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) in Antwerp, Belgium made a breakthrough in bridging high tech molecular biology research on microbial pathogens and the needs of the poorest of the poor. After sequencing the complete genome of Leishmania donovani (a parasite causing one of the most important tropical diseases after malaria) in hundreds of clinical isolates, they identified a series of mutations specific...


Latest Zoonoses Reference Libraries

Paragonimus westermani
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Paragonimus westermani is a species of fluke, or flatworm that is classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum. This species is abundant in South America and Asia and affects the lungs of humans and other hosts. It was first discovered in 1878 in Europe after two Bengal tigers died. In 1879, Ringer found this species in the lungs of a human. Manson and Erwin von Baelz identified the sputum and eggs separately in 1880, after which Manson asserted that a snail was most likely the worm's...

Eye-worm, Loa loa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The eye-worm (Loa loa) is a species of roundworm within the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in India and Africa, among other areas. This species causes a disease known as Loa loa filariasis and is one of three species that can cause subcutaneous filariasis in humans. Females are larger than males, reaching an average body length of up to 2.7 inches, with males reaching an average body length of up to 1.3 inches. The first stage of life for the eye-worm begins when an adult worm, which is...

Dog Roundworm, Toxocara canis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The dog roundworm (Toxocara canis) is a species of parasitic worm that infects canid species. It is yellowish white in color and can reach an average length between 3.5 and 7 inches, with females typically growing large than males. The dog roundworm can be transmitted in four different ways. The most common form of transmission occurs when an egg containing second stage larvae is released onto the ground in feces. Once the egg has been ingested, it will move through the small intestines...

800px-White-footed_Mouse,_Quetico
2012-04-02 20:35:58

The White-footed Mouse, (Peromyscus leucopus), is a species of rodent native to North America. Its range extends from Ontario, Quebec, Labrador and the Maritime Provinces (excluding Newfoundland) south to the southwestern United States and Mexico. In Texas this creature is known as the Woodmouse. The adult of this species measures 3.5 to 3.9 inches in length, not counting the tail, which can measure an additional 2.5 to 3.8 inches. It weighs typically about an ounce. It has a maximum life...

0_86d2284273d6244c9ff290b35cdd2cf2
2011-04-25 21:24:26

Rickettsia rickettsii is a gram-negative bacterium native to the New World and causes the malady known as Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). It is transmitted through the bit of an infected tick when it feeds on animals and humans. Humans are not necessary hosts in the rickettsia-tick life cycle but they can be. S. Burt Wolbach created the first detailed description of the etiologic agent in 1919. He recognized it as an intracellular bacterium seen most frequently in endothelial cells....

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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