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Latest Zooplankton Stories

2010-01-17 08:35:00

An increase in the variability of local conditions could do more to harm biodiversity than slower shifts in climate, a new study has found. Climate scientists predict more frequent storms, droughts, floods and heat waves as the Earth warms. Although extreme weather would seem to challenge ecosystems, the effect of fluctuating conditions on biodiversity actually could go either way. Species able to tolerate only a narrow range of temperatures, for example, may be eliminated, but instability in...

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2009-11-24 08:25:00

What constitutes fish food is a matter of debate. A high-profile study a few years ago suggested that fish get almost 50 percent of their carbon from trees and leaves, evidence for a very close link between the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. But new research from the University of Washington shows this is not likely to be true. Algae provide a much richer diet for fish and other aquatic life, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...

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2009-07-23 09:00:00

For a long time scientists have observed the biological consequences of global climate change. One of the most famous symptoms is the shift of habitats from the equator further north or further south. More recent studies show that not only the habitats but also the size of organisms is affected. Dr. Martin Daufresne of the HYAX Lake Ecosystem Laboratory in Aix-en-Provence, France, as well as Prof. Ulrich Sommer and Dr. Kathrin Lengfellner of the Leibniz-Institute of Marine Sciences...

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2009-05-07 09:05:40

Plankton blooms do not send atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean Oceanographers Jim Bishop and Todd Wood of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have measured the fate of carbon particles originating in plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean, using data that deep-diving Carbon Explorer floats collected around the clock for well over a year. Their study reveals that most of the carbon from lush plankton blooms never reaches the deep ocean. The surprising...

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2008-11-11 15:45:00

Researchers say they are now using satellite monitoring of marine environments for predicting cholera outbreaks. Cholera outbreaks follow seasonal increases in sea temperature, scientists said, and this could provide an early warning system for India and Bangladesh where cholera epidemics occur regularly. Tiny animals, which increase in number with sea temperature rise, bring the cholera pathogen into the drinking water supply. The satellites were able to pick up sea temperature changes in...

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2008-09-03 11:21:37

Scientists in the USA have established a way to predict outbreaks of cholera, making it easier to control. This finding could provide a model to predict and potentially control outbreaks of other important infectious diseases. Cholera is a serious, ancient water-borne infectious disease, which is an unpredictable and severe problem for developing countries. The bacterium that causes cholera, Vibrio cholerae, has a known association with a crustacean (called a copepod) which lives on...

2006-05-04 10:50:04

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Scientists have found about 10-20 new species of tiny creatures in the depths of the Atlantic in a survey that will gauge whether global warming may harm life in the oceans, an international report said on Thursday. The survey, of tropical waters between the eastern United States and the mid-Atlantic ridge, used special nets to catch fragile zooplankton -- animals such as shrimp, jellyfish and swimming worms -- at lightless...

2006-05-04 10:50:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO -- Scientists have found about 10-20 new species of tiny creatures in the depths of the Atlantic in a survey that will gauge whether global warming may harm life in the oceans, an international report said on Thursday. The survey, of tropical waters between the eastern United States and the mid-Atlantic ridge, used special nets to catch fragile zooplankton -- animals such as shrimp, jellyfish and swimming worms -- at lightless depths of 1-5 km...

2006-05-04 10:35:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Scientists have found about 10-20 new species of tiny creatures in the depths of the Atlantic in a survey that will gauge whether global warming may harm life in the oceans, an international report said on Thursday. The survey, of tropical waters between the eastern United States and the mid-Atlantic ridge, used special nets to catch fragile zooplankton -- animals such as shrimp, jellyfish and swimming worms -- at lightless depths...

2006-05-04 10:00:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO -- Scientists have found about 10-20 new species of tiny creatures in the depths of the Atlantic in a survey that will gauge whether global warming may harm life in the oceans, an international report said on Thursday. The survey, of tropical waters between the eastern United States and the mid-Atlantic ridge, used special nets to catch fragile zooplankton -- animals such as shrimp, jellyfish and swimming worms -- at lightless depths of 1-5 km...


Latest Zooplankton Reference Libraries

Bennett’s feather star, Oxycomanthus bennetti
2013-08-04 08:28:29

Bennett's feather star is a suspension feeder that grows to be about 1 foot with 31-120 arms extending upward from the body. The star catches the food, usually phytoplankton and zooplankton, with tubed feet located on the outside of the arms. Yellow, Brown, Green and Purple are the most common colors for the Bennett's feather star. The star will remain attached to the seabed by a stalk until it reaches maturity and then becomes free-living by breaking off from the stalk. The Bennett's...

Black Sea Cucumber, Holothuria forskali
2013-01-28 14:44:54

Image Caption: Black Sea Cucumber, Holothuria forskali. Credit: Rpillon/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The black sea cucumber (Holothuria forskali), also known as the cotton-spinner, is a species that can be found in the Mediterranean Sea and eastern areas of the Atlantic Ocean. Its range includes the waters around the Azores and the Canary Islands. It prefers to reside in shallow waters at depths of up to 164 feet and can be found on rocky, vertical surfaces. In 1969, Rowe classified it within...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'