Is Sex During the Second Trimester Safe?

People’s approach to sex during pregnancy can vary drastically. Some women have an increased sex drive when they’re pregnant, while others have a lowered libido. The physical symptoms of pregnancy, such as nausea or lightheadedness, can have an effect on this too.

Some men find it interesting or appealing to have sex when a woman is pregnant. Others are afraid to have sex with a pregnant partner because they think it might hurt her or the baby. Similarly, some women hesitate because of safety concerns.

So is sex during the second trimester safe? What about the rest of the pregnancy? You can find the answers below. You will also gain insight into the risks of sex during pregnancy and the positions which are the most suited for it.

Sex during Pregnancy

Many people believe that sex can harm the baby, induce premature labor, or even cause a miscarriage. But none of this is true in the case of low-risk pregnancies.

Gynecologists have confirmed that sex during pregnancy is usually very safe. Women whose pregnancies are without complications can relax and enjoy themselves if they feel sexual desire.

If you have a typical pregnancy, your baby will be safe during all stages, even if you have plenty of vaginal sex. The baby is surrounded by amniotic fluid and kept safe by the strong muscles of the uterus. At the same time, the cervix is closed by a mucus plug, so you don’t have to worry about most infections.

Note that this doesn’t apply to STDs – if there is any chance that your sexual partner got infected, you should avoid having sex with him during the pregnancy.

Sex during the First Trimester

Women’s sex drive in the first trimester is usually low because of nausea, vomiting, or exhaustion. It can also take some time to get used to the thought of being pregnant, especially in the case of the first pregnancy.

However, it is easier to have sex before your belly grows and some positions become unavailable. So if you feel up to it, feel free to continue your sex life without any changes.

Sex during the Second Trimester

Is sex during the second trimester safe? The answer is definitely yes, as long as you have a regular risk-free pregnancy. While vaginal dryness is a possibility for some, many women experience increased lubrication at this time. Additionally, the dizziness and nausea might decrease by the second trimester, and you may feel more relaxed and calm.

Keep in mind that your genital area may become engorged, but that is no cause for panic. Your stomach still won’t reach its peak, so you can enjoy sex in various positions.

Sex during The Third Trimester

When the third trimester kicks in, the size of your belly may cause practical difficulties, and you might also feel fatigued again. Sex during the final trimester can be all-around physically difficult, and both sides just might not be up for it.

Having intercourse when the due date is near is not recommended. It is not confirmed to cause early labor, but it can cause contractions.

Recommended Positions

The man must pay extra attention to the woman’s comfort during pregnancy, no matter which trimester she is in. Positions where the man is on top should be avoided, especially in the later months of pregnancy. As the woman’s body goes through changes, it may become difficult to find a comfortable position.

Woman on top positions are generally fine, as well as sex from behind or from side to side. The woman should avoid lying on her back during sex, as the uterus may exert too much pressure on some of the major blood vessels.

Anal Sex

Anal sex in itself is safe during pregnancy, but it’s not recommended if the woman has hemorrhoids as a result of her condition. Vaginal sex after anal sex is not a good idea because it can cause the bacteria from the anus to spread to the vagina, leading to vaginal infections.

Oral Sex

Oral sex is the safest option throughout pregnancy, but there is one precaution you should keep in mind. While performing oral sex on the pregnant woman, her partner should avoid blowing air into her vagina. This can lead to an air embolism, which can block a blood vessel and present a serious risk to both the mother and the baby. However, this happens very rarely.

When to Abstain from Sex in Pregnancy

While most women can have sex during pregnancy, some should avoid it for medical reasons. Women who have a history of labor difficulties and some other symptoms should avoid sex.

Sex is not recommended in the following cases:

  • Placenta Previa – The condition causing the placenta to block the cervix. Women affected have a higher risk of bleeding during sex in pregnancy.
  • PROM – Premature rupture of membranes happens when there is a hole in the sac which holds the amniotic fluid and the developing baby. The sac can also outright burst. If this was the case in a previous pregnancy, it’s better to avoid vaginal sex now.
  • Bleeding and discharge after sex – If a pregnant woman bleeds or releases discharge which smells funky after sex, it is important to consult a gynecologist about whether it’s safe to have sex.
  • Miscarriage – If a woman already had a miscarriage, it is best to avoid intercourse during pregnancy.
  • Incompetent cervix – A condition that causes the cervix to dilate and efface with no contractions. Avoid sex if this occurred in your previous pregnancy.
  • Preterm labor – If you went into labor ahead of time in the past, sex near the due date is not advised.

Should You Have Sex During Pregnancy

For most women, sex during pregnancy is totally safe and risk-free, both for her and the baby. Not every position will be comfortable, so be cautious about that, especially in the later months of pregnancy.

Sexual appetite during pregnancy varies from person to person, but it can also change from trimester to trimester. Maintaining a regular sex life is possible when you’re pregnant, as long as you communicate with your partner and take care not to overexert yourself.

 

References:

https://www.marchofdimes.org/pregnancy/sex-during-pregnancy.aspx
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/sex-during-pregnancy/art-20045318
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3080531/

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