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Women Admit To Sexting More Than Men

July 20, 2011

Despite recent scandals exposing men who were found to be “sexting”, a survey of married and single people looking for noncommittal flirtation and hookups online found that two-thirds of women reported sending sexually explicit texts or photos of themselves via phone or email, while only half of the men did, The Huffington Post is reporting.

“Cheating is alive and well, and sexting is on the rise,” Diane Kholos Wysocki, a professor of sociology and women’s studies at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, told the New York Times. “But I don’t believe the internet is causing people to cheat.

There seems to be something going on with marriage that’s the bigger social issue. Before, people would just get a divorce. For some reason, people are staying and cheating instead.”

“Of course, this is a self-selected population, but I’ve also observed that women are more likely to show pictures of themselves than guys are. I think that may be changing though — evening out,” Wysocki told ABC News Good Morning America.

Women were also more likely to meet people in real life after meeting them online (83 percent of women compared with 67 percent of men). But they were less likely to be anxious about being caught looking at sexually explicit material and less cautious than men about sweeping up their cybertrails.

Wysocki was not surprised. “I know young men who are constantly getting naked pictures from women they know on their phones,” she told the New York Times. “They’re constant!”

Wysocki surveyed more than 5,000 men and women using the “swingers” site AshleyMadison.com — granted, a sample skewed toward those inclined to cheat.

Thanks to former New York Rep. Anthony Weiner’s recent sexting debacle, the practice has entered the spotlight as a controversial form of infidelity. If two people never meet, never touch — is it still cheating, or is it just e-cheating? Is there a difference?

Between recent controversies over rampant high school sexting and e-cheating of the Weiner variety, sexting has gotten a bad wrap, says Laplante, but it doesn’t have to. While inherently explicit, sexting doesn’t have to be illicit, she says.

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