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Researchers Model Yellowstone Super-Eruption Ash Cloud

Researchers Model Yellowstone Super-Eruption Ash Cloud

A new study from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) suggests that the ash cloud from a Yellowstone supereruption would blanket the Rocky Mountains several meters deep, and it would deposit...

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And Then There Were 10 -- Unexpected Diversity In New

At the stroke of a pen a New Zealand endemic tree has for the last 31 years been incorrectly regarded the same as a group of 'weedy' Australian shrubs and small trees.

Fossil Discovery Identifies Earliest Evidence For Animals

An unusual new fossil discovery of one of the earliest animals on earth may also provide the oldest evidence of muscle tissue – the bundles of cells that make movement in animals possible.

Genetic Modification Invasive Species Overlooked In

Recent increases in population and economic growth have increased the demand for land-plant biomass for food, fuel and other purposes, but the supply of leaf, stem, root, fruit and other terrestrial plant-based materials has been hampered by a limit to what can naturally be produced.

The Digital World And Face-To-Face Emotions

In a world that is vastly dominated by technology, what are the impacts? Often, people look at the benefits of technology, which are numerous, but we do not always consider the problems and costs associated with its daily use.

Are We Living Inside A 2-D Hologram - Fermilab Experiment To

A unique experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) will look at the very structure of our universe and answer some big questions - including whether we live inside a 2-D hologram.

Brain-In-A-Jar Science Zombie Ant Fungus Know The Brains Of

A parasitic fungus that reproduces by manipulating the behavior of ants emits a cocktail of behavior-controlling chemicals when encountering the brain of its natural target host, but not when infecting other ant species, a new study shows.

Taung Childs Skull And Brain Not Human-Like In Expansion

The Taung Child, South Africa’s premier hominin discovered 90 years ago by Wits University Professor Raymond Dart, never ceases to transform and evolve the search for our collective origins.

Indiana University Research Just Right Plant Growth May Make

Research by Indiana University geologists suggests that an intermediate amount of vegetation -- not too little and not too much -- is most effective at stabilizing freshwater river deltas.

Trash Burning Worldwide Significantly Worsens Air Pollution

Unregulated trash burning around the globe is pumping far more pollution into the atmosphere than shown by official records.

Newly Discovery Atlantic Methane Vents Could Pose Global

Geologists have discovered more than 500 bubbling methane vents on the seafloor of the northern part of the US Atlantic margin.

How Neurons Respond To Sequences Of Familiar Objects

The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images.

How To Find Simplicity In The Brain

Scientists can now monitor and record the activity of hundreds of neurons concurrently in the brain, and ongoing technology developments promise to increase this number manyfold.

Signatures Of Selection Inscribed On Poplar Genomes - Study

One aspect of the climate change models researchers have been developing looks at how plant ranges might shift, and how factors such as temperature, water availability, and light levels might come into play.

X-ray Laser Probes Tiny Quantum Tornadoes In Superfluid

An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum "tornadoes" inside microscopic droplets of supercooled liquid helium – the first time this formation has been seen at such a tiny scale.

Newly Discovered Hot Springs Bacteria Can Use Far-Red Light

A type of bacteria growing in a hot spring near Yellowstone National Park in Montana uses a previously unidentified process to harvest energy and produce oxygen from sunlight, according to new research published in a recent edition of the journal Science.

Genetic Analysis Reveals How Honeybees Respond To Diseases

Honeybees are more genetically diverse than originally thought, and the species might have originated from Asia and not Africa as previously believed, according to new research published online Sunday in the journal Nature Genetics.

The Spanish Were Eating Snails 30000 Years Ago Long Before

Archaeologists have uncovered evidence that Homo sapiens in Spain ate snails around 30,000 years ago, 10,000 years before the French, whose escargot dish is now celebrated.

Early Jurassic Basal Mammals Were Specialized Eaters

Researchers from several British universities have found that small Jurassic mammals chose very specific diets from among the smorgasbord of insects available to them, with creatures of a similar type having distinct food choices.

Water Splitter Developed That Runs On An Ordinary AAA

scientists have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis.

Driving Brain Rhythm Makes Mice More Sensitive To Touch

In a new study researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention. The study in mice, reported in Nature Neuroscience, provides the first direct evidence that the brain’s “gamma” rhythms have a causal role in processing the sense of touch.


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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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Quote of the Day
There does not exist a category of science to which one can give the name applied science. There are science and the applications of science, bound together as the fruit of the tree which bears it.

- Louis Pasteur (1822 - 1895), French chemist.
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