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Whale sharks finally receive international protection

Whale sharks finally receive international protection

Whale sharks, the biggest fish in the ocean, now are protected by NOAA and, if netted, must be released unharmed.

Latest Science Stories

Picky penguins losing battle to climate change

LSU studied penguin eating habits and found that Chinstrap penguins need to change their diet to beat climate change.

This week in obvious science or research we cant believe

There's a lot of research in the world that's worthwhile. And then there's stuff like this, which makes us wonder, "Who spent money on this s**t?"

Wood burning might help sustainable fuel problem

Wood burning fuel in developing nations may not be as bad for the environment as previously thought. Break out the marshmallows!

Botched repair attempt damages King Tuts burial mask

This seems more like an episode of "The Three Stooges" than it does a real news event.

Scan finds new tattoos on 5300-year-old Iceman

A new study has used advanced imaging techniques to identify previously unknown tattoos on the ribcage of the 5300-year old man known as Ötzi, bringing his total number of tattoos to 61.

Snake expert NY Daily News sensationalized story about

Over the weekend, a Lowe's customer in Mississippi was bitten by a snake on a store rack. Resident snake expert breaks down what breed of snake this probably was, and if people should actually be afraid. (Hint: They shouldn't.)

Plant fossils can be used to determine prehistoric tree

Clues contained in the cells of plant fossils could be used to determine the density of trees and other forms of vegetation some 50 million years ago, according to new research published in this week’s edition of the peer-reviewed journal Science.

Whose bodies are buried in this Alexander the Great-era tomb

An Alexander the Great-era tomb found in near Thessaloniki contains at least five corpses, leading to rampant speculation regarding exactly who was buried there.

First-ever deep core drilling project underway in Antarctica

Braving the conditions of the South Pole, researchers from the University of Washington and the University of California, Irvine are in the process of drilling the first-ever deep ice core from that region of Antarctica.

Indias endangered tigers roar back

In rare (but welcome) conservation news, officials in New Delhi have announced a 30 percent rise in tiger population over the past four years. Huzzah!

Wolves social skills helped with canine domestication

According to popular theory, wild canines only became “man’s best friend” after years of domestication that bred out any ill-temperament or erratic behaviors. However, a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology has found that the innate social skills of wolves probably formed the foundation of dogs’ domestication.

New x-ray technique helps archaeologists read ash-preserved

When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the hot ash it released preserved a complete library of papyrus scrolls, among other things, in the Roman town of Pompeii. Previous attempts to read these scrolls by physically unraveling them typically led to their destruction, but now, a new X-ray technique has allowed researchers to decipher the ancient text without touching them, according to a new report in Nature Communications.

Neanderthal multi-tool discovered

Somewhere the Geico cavemen are rejoicing.

The struggle was real for post-Soviet-collapse animals

The collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s turned the society and economics of Russia and Eastern Europe upside-down, but it wasn’t just people who were being affected.

Cone snail poisons prey with insulin

With their slow traveling speeds and lack of obvious offensive weapons, cone snails might not seem like much of a predator, but a new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study indicates that these creatures have a secret weapon: a toxic form of insulin.

Scientists discover reason for sudden tectonic movements

Sudden tectonic plate movements have puzzled scientists for decades, but now they believe they have the answer. And like fried chicken, it's all in the crust.

New fossils reveal dinosaurs may have been caring parents

We typically don’t think of cold-blooded dinosaurs as caring parents, but a new report shows one species that tended to its young after birth.

Chimps can discuss their favorite fruits and food sources

Chimpanzees can modify their food call structure in relation to their favorite types of fruits and the size of the trees where those consumable can be found, according to new research published in the March 2015 edition of the journal Animal Behaviour.

50000 gallons of oil spilled in Yellowstone River officials

Yesterday, Montana officials reported a breach in an oil pipeline that spilled up to 50,000 gallons of oil into the Yellowstone River. Thankfully much of the river is frozen, lessening the environmental impact of the leak.


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Word of the Day
lahar
  • A volcanic mudflow.
The word 'lahar' comes from Javanese.
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Quote of the Day
Man lives for science as well as bread.

- William James (1842 - 1910)
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