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Frigate birds can spend two months in the air, study finds

Scientists have known frigate birds are capable of flying for long period of time, but researchers who conducted a recently-published study were likely shocked to find out just how long – nearly two months! Published in the journal Science, the…

Simulation of the ozone layer

The Antarctic ozone hole is healing, study finds

The hole in the Antarctic ozone layer is slowing beginning to heal, mostly thanks to an international treaty signed in 1987 banning the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), according to new research published in this week’s edition of the peer-reviewed journal…

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Study finds first evidence of risk-taking behavior in plants

A team from Oxford University alongside colleagues in Isreal recently found that pea plants are able to take risks-- a characteristic previously unseen outside of the animal kingdom.  A full-text version of their study was recently published in the journal Current…

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Wreck of Royal Albert cargo schooner discovered in Lake Ontario

A recently-discovered shipwreck could shed new light on shipping methods around the Great Lakes in the post-Civil War period. According to a report from the Associated Press, the wreck of the Royal Albert schooner was discovered 35 miles northwest of…

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Dinosaur extinction let mammal evolution ‘explode’

Mammals evolved far more quickly in the 10 million years following the mass extinction of the dinosaurs than they did during the previous 80 million years, according to a new study published online Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the…

Pigs grazing on the grass field. Pigs grazing on the meadow

Pigs communicate ‘personality’ through grunts, study finds

While they may not exactly be speaking Pig Latin, new research indicates that members of the Suidae family of even-toed ungulates can reveal important information about their personalities and their overall welfare through the grunts they use to communicate. Published…

In Mike’s recent Nature paper (Sutikna et al., 2016) we provided new dates for presence of hobbits at Liang Bua, with last dated fossil remains of around 60,000 and based on stone tools around 50,000. This is contrary to previous dates that suggested they survived on Flores until around 18,000 or even 12,000 year ago. One of the upshots of this article was that there now existed a ‘gap’ in the chronology of the sequence from around 46,000–20,000 years ago. In my Journal of Archaeological Science (JAS) paper i examine a different part of the sediment sequence, exposed at the rear of the cave, that fills much of this missing chronology (roughly 41–20,000 years), based on new radiocarbon ages. I am a geoarchaeologist, and I study sediments to infer past environments at the site, and to understand how the site formed, either by natural sediment accumulation and/or by human (hominin) agency. I show how the interior of the site changed over a roughly 200,000 year period (that includes the 46–20,000 year gap recognised in Sutikna et al., 2016), coinciding with periods of wetter and drier climate.

Fire use discovery sheds light on the demise of the ‘hobbits’

In a discovery that could help explain how and why Homo floresiensis, the extinct species also known as the hobbits, disappeared approximately 50,000 years ago, researchers have discovered that modern humans had been using fire in Indonesia far earlier than…

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Human activity created a new mosquito species, study shows

We know species around the planet are going extinct due to human activities, but humans are also triggering the rapid development and emergence of new species, according to a new report. Published in Proceedings of Royal Society B, the new…

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Cretaceous period bird wings found trapped in amber

While we know dinosaurs and early birds had feathers, fossils haven’t been able to provide us with many details on what those feathers looked like-- until now. Fortunately, researchers recently stumbled upon the 100 million-year-old remains of two tiny wings…

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New pear-shaped nucleus could ruin time travel forever

A new form of atomic nuclei has been confirmed, and its very existence may change what we thought were the fundamental aspects of physics—and could put a nail in the coffin of time travel, according to a new paper in…