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Marine Debris Evidence Of Massive Hawaiian Tsunami

Marine Debris Evidence Of Massive Hawaiian Tsunami

The massive tsunami that struck Japan in 2011 was a wake-up call for Honolulu officials, who immediately began working on updating the island's evacuation plans and procedures. This renewed...

Latest Science Stories

New Tracers Can Identify Frack Fluids In The Environment

Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment.

Scientists Create Possible Precursor To Life

How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions not only occupy the minds of scientists interested in the origin of life, but also researchers working with technology of the future.

Researchers Discover The Origins Of Sex In The Primordial

According to a new study in the journal Nature, a team of international researchers has found the earliest-known organism to reproduce by sexual intercourse, a small bony fish known as Microbrachius dicki.

Cambridge Scientists Devise Possible New Way To Test For

The discovery of hidden signs of consciousness in vegetative-state patients could help doctors determine if people are aware even if they appear to be unresponsive, according to research published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

Mummy Remains Refute Antiquity Of Ankylosing Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families.

Gecko Locomotion What Goes Up Must Come Down

Found in warm regions of the world, geckos are extremely capable of climbing up steep, smooth surfaces. To do so, they employ an adhesive system — a key evolutionary innovation that facilitates climbing vertically, and even in inverted positions.

Clothing Waste A Growing Problems Because Most Millennials

Due to budget cuts and other concerns, some school districts have been cutting back on home economics classes and the loss of these classes could be causing a significant drop-off in clothing maintenance skills among millennials.

NOAA Finds Fewer Days Featuring Tornadoes But Increased

Tornado activity in the US has remained fairly constant since the 1970s, but the number of days featuring them has decreased, meaning that twisters are more likely to come in clusters now than in the past, according to new research published Friday in the journal Science.

Giant Extinct Kangaroos Did Not Hop

Modern kangaroos are known for their hopping abilities, but that doesn’t mean we should assume that all ancient relatives of the marsupial used this mode of transportation.

Caribbean Coral Reef Inhabitants Critical In Determining

New research led by the University of Exeter has found that species that live in and erode coral reefs will play a major role in determining the future of reefs.

How The Fruit Fly Could Help Us Sniff Out Drugs And Bombs

A fly’s sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs, new University of Sussex research has found.

If The Earths Magnetic Field Flipped Now What Would The

Imagine waking up after a night of camping to find that your compass is pointing south rather than north. It can happen. The magnetic field around Earth has flipped before — though not overnight. In fact, it has happened many times throughout the planet's history.

New Study Indicates That Increased Natural Gas Use Will Not

While the influx of natural gas could alter where the world gets its energy from, it is unlikely to slow the growth of global greenhouse gas emissions over the long term, according to new research published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

1934 Dust Bowl Drought Was The Worst In A Thousand Years

A new study from NASA and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has revealed that the drought of 1934 was not only the worst of the Dust Bowl, but the worst drought felt worldwide in the last 1,000 years.

No Bed Of Roses Ten Things To Know About Sunflowers

As fall fields turn bright with color, what might we learn from roadside rows of sunflowers - and the sunflower seeds widely used to feed birds in colder weather?

The Cloudy Future Of Arctic Sea Ice

Climate change is a global phenomenon, yet Earth scientists are keeping a wary eye on one place in particular - the Arctic.

Some Sections Of The San Andreas Fault System On San

Four urban sections of the San Andreas Fault system in Northern California have stored enough energy to produce major earthquakes, according to a new study that measures fault creep.

Hydraulic Fracturing Linked To Earthquakes In Ohio

Hydraulic fracturing triggered a series of small earthquakes in 2013 on a previously unmapped fault in Harrison County, Ohio, according to a study published in the journal Seismological Research Letters.

Ancient Chariot Found By University Of Leicester

Discovered in the ongoing excavation of an Iron Age hill fort near Leicester, the main highlight of the archeological find was several bronze fittings identified as parts of a 2nd or 3rd century BC chariot.

Plants May Be Taking Up More Atmospheric Carbon Than Models

New research led by scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee has found that global climate change models may have underestimated the amount of carbon dioxide absorption by green plants.


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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.
Quote of the Day
The atom, being for all practical purposes the stable unit of the physical plane, is a constantly changing vortex of reactions.

- Unknown
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