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Exercise Found To Boost The Brainpower Of Young Children

Exercise Found To Boost The Brainpower Of Young Children

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Youngsters who are more physically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their less-fit counterparts, according to new research appearing in the August...

Latest Brain Stories

2014-08-20 04:20:01

Eisai Submits Applications for Antiepilepsy Agent Fycompa Simultaneously In Europe and U.S. Seeking Indication Expansion as Adjunctive Treatment of Primary Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures Tokyo, Aug 20, 2014 - (JCN Newswire) - Eisai Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Tokyo, CEO: Haruo Naito, "Eisai") announced today that it has submitted applications to regulatory authorities in the U.S. and Europe (the FDA and EMA respectively) for the...

jet lag gene
2014-08-17 02:00:17

Salk Institute for Biological Studies Salk researchers discover a master gene responsible for sleep and wake cycles, offering hope for a drug that could help reset sleep Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. The discovery of the role of this gene, called Lhx1, provides scientists with a potential therapeutic target to help night-shift workers or jet lagged travelers adjust to time differences more...

thalamic reticular nucleus
2014-08-16 05:55:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Last night you couldn't get to sleep until the wee hours, and today you can't seem to concentrate on anything. You know the two are related, but how? A new study led by NYU Langone Medical Center and funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has found that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. The findings, published in Cell, may represent a breakthrough...

How The Woodpecker Avoids Brain Injury Despite High-speed Impacts
2014-08-13 03:52:28

Science China Press Designing structures and devices that protect the body from shock and vibrations during high-velocity impacts is a universal challenge. Scientists and engineers focusing on this challenge might make advances by studying the unique morphology of the woodpecker, whose body functions as an excellent anti-shock structure. The woodpecker's brain can withstand repeated collisions and deceleration of 1200 g during rapid pecking. This anti-shock feature relates to the...

cyborg science
2014-08-12 03:00:28

American Chemical Society No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible progress toward real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultraflexible circuits. Now taking this human-machine concept to an unprecedented level, pioneering scientists are working on the seamless marriage between electronics and brain signaling with the potential to transform our understanding of how the brain works — and how to treat its most devastating diseases....

3d brain tissue
2014-08-12 05:03:27

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A team of bioengineers from Tufts University in Massachusetts have developed three-dimensional brain-like cortical tissue that is similar in structure and function to tissues found in the brain of a rat, exhibits biochemical and electrophysiological responses, and can be kept alive in the laboratory for more than eight weeks. In research published in the August 11 early online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National...

2014-08-08 11:28:28

Emory University Physicists have identified a mechanism that may help explain Zipf’s law – a unique pattern of behavior found in disparate systems, including complex biological ones. The journal Physical Review Letters is publishing their mathematical models, which demonstrate how Zipf’s law naturally arises when a sufficient number of units react to a hidden variable in a system. “We’ve discovered a method that produces Zipf’s law without fine-tuning and with very few...

2014-08-08 10:55:19

Vanderbilt University Medical Center Researchers in the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS) have achieved the first conclusive non-invasive measurement of neural signaling in the spinal cords of healthy human volunteers. Their technique, described today in the journal eLife, may aid efforts to help patients recover from spinal cord injuries and other disorders affecting spinal cord function, including multiple sclerosis. "We definitely hope that this work can...

Boosting Insect Aggression By Altering Brain Metabolism
2014-08-08 03:18:14

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Scientists report they can crank up insect aggression simply by interfering with a basic metabolic pathway in the insect brain. Their study, of fruit flies and honey bees, shows a direct, causal link between brain metabolism (how the brain generates the energy it needs to function) and aggression. The team reports its findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The new research follows up on previous work from the...

2014-08-07 23:12:05

Tom Looney, diagnosed with MSA in 2008, worked closely with tech industry icons, including Steve Jobs. His unique experiences and talents will now be utilized to represent patients and increase awareness for this rare and terminal neurological disorder. Wilmington, NC (PRWEB) August 07, 2014 The Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) Coalition, an organization dedicated to serving patients, caregivers and families touched by MSA, has announced the appointment of veteran tech industry exec Tom...


Latest Brain Reference Libraries

Cerebellum
2013-07-29 09:48:00

The cerebellum is a section of the brain that is most in charge of cognitive functions and motor skills. Formation and Orientation The cerebellum can be found at the bottom of the brain behind the pons and below that cerebral cortex under a layer of dura mater. It is considered as a part of the "hindbrain". The cerebellum is anatomically divided into two separate hemispheres, marked by the 'vermis', a small midline zone between the left and right hemispheres. But three lobes can be...

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.