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Latest Brain Stories

2014-08-28 23:05:28

This webinar will provide experienced and novice researchers with an overview of the current optical imaging methods driving neuroscience today. Part of the BioTechniques free webinar series. New York, NY (PRWEB) August 28, 2014 In the coming years, considerable effort and resources will be directed at understanding the neural connections of the brain. This webinar examines many of the tools being used to study how neurons interact with one another at their synapses. Event Date: Tuesday,...

2014-08-27 23:12:37

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. (PRWEB) August 27, 2014 Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. Evolution has harmonized the behavior of humans and all other...

How To Find Simplicity In The Brain
2014-08-26 03:02:11

Carnegie Mellon University Scientists can now monitor and record the activity of hundreds of neurons concurrently in the brain, and ongoing technology developments promise to increase this number manyfold. However, simply recording the neural activity does not automatically lead to a clearer understanding of how the brain works. In a new review paper published in Nature Neuroscience, Carnegie Mellon University's Byron M. Yu and Columbia University's John P. Cunningham describe the...

How Neurons Respond To Sequences Of familiar Objects
2014-08-26 03:43:44

Carnegie Mellon University The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study from Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), a joint project between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images. The study is published online by Nature Neuroscience. The CNBC researchers...

gamma rhythm
2014-08-25 03:30:14

David Orenstein, Brown University In a new study researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention. The study in mice, reported in Nature Neuroscience, provides the first direct evidence that the brain’s “gamma” rhythms have a causal role in processing the sense of touch. By striking up the right rhythm in the right brain region at the right time, Brown University neuroscientists report that they...

2014-08-21 23:00:21

Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers in Georgia State University’s Brains and Behavior Program have found. Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) August 22, 2014 Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers in Georgia State University’s Brains and Behavior Program have found. This could imply that humans are less...

2014-08-21 12:30:01

Newly created position will pioneer novel technologies to investigate the workings of the brain SEATTLE, Aug. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The Allen Institute for Brain Science announces the appointment of Peter Saggau, Ph.D., as the Senior Director of Research Engineering. In this newly created position, Saggau will work closely with research scientists to create the new technologies required to investigate how the brain works. "Peter's innovative history in both technology and...

2014-08-21 12:29:58

World-class neuroscientist from Stanford University brings expertise in synapse diversity and neural processing to research team SEATTLE, Aug. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The Allen Institute for Brain Science welcomes renowned neuroscientist Stephen J Smith, Ph.D., as a Senior Investigator. At the Allen Institute, Smith will build on his years of expertise in studying the brain to better understand the mechanisms behind neural computation in the human cortex. "We are very fortunate to...

sleep disturbances with age
2014-08-21 05:23:23

Bonnie Prescott, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center A group of neurons are found to function as a 'sleep switch' in the brain As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. In individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, this common and troubling symptom of aging tends to be especially pronounced, often leading to nighttime confusion and wandering. Now, a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess...

fit and smart
2014-08-20 05:27:56

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Youngsters who are more physically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their less-fit counterparts, according to new research appearing in the August 19 edition of the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Iowa and Michigan State University recruited two dozen 9- and 10-year-old...


Latest Brain Reference Libraries

Cerebellum
2013-07-29 09:48:00

The cerebellum is a section of the brain that is most in charge of cognitive functions and motor skills. Formation and Orientation The cerebellum can be found at the bottom of the brain behind the pons and below that cerebral cortex under a layer of dura mater. It is considered as a part of the "hindbrain". The cerebellum is anatomically divided into two separate hemispheres, marked by the 'vermis', a small midline zone between the left and right hemispheres. But three lobes can be...

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'